28 Marso 2011 post: Ellen Gallagher, Selected Works & Interview

Ellen Gallagher, Greasy, 2011, ink, oil, graphite and printed paper on canvas, 79 1/2 x 74 inches (202 cm x 188 cm) Photo by Tom Powel (image source: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Bone-Brite, 2009, ink, graphite, charcoal, oil, palladium leaf, and cut paper on canvas, 202 x 188 x 6.5 cm / 79 1/2 x 74 x 2 1/2 in Photo: Mike Bruce (image source: http://www.hauserwirth.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, An Experiment of Unusual Opportunity, 2008, ink, graphite, oil, varnish and cut paper on canvas, 202 x 188 cm / 79 1/2 x 74 in Photo: Studio E. Gallagher (image source: http://www.hauserwirth.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, La Chinoise, 2008, pencil, ink, oil, watercolour and cut paper on paper, 76.5 x 111.5 cm / 30 1/8 x 43 7/8 in Photo: Studio E. Gallagher (image source: http://www.hauserwirth.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, IGBT, 2008, gesso, gold leaf, ink, varnish and cut paper on paper, 79 1/2 x 74 inches (201.9 x 188 cm) (image source: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Coral Cities, 2007, ink, watercolour, gold leaf, cut paper and plasticine on Ebony Magazine page, 32.5 x 25 cm /12 3/4 x 9 7/8 in Photo: Mike Bruce (image source: http://www.hauserwirth.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Dirty O's, 2006, pencil, ink, watercolour, plasticine and cut paper on paper, 80.5 x 60.5 x 5.5 cm / 31 3/4 x 23 7/8 x 2 1/8 in (image source: http://www.hauserwirth.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Untitled, 2006, oil, ink and paper on linen, 61 x 61 cm / 24 x 24 in GALLA36742 Photo: Mike Bruce (image source: http://www.hauserwirth.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Corns, 2006, plasticine, 89 x 55 cm (image source: http://www.hauserwirth.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Light n Write, 2006, plasticine, 89 x 55 cm (image source: http://www.hauserwirth.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Abu Simbel, 2005, photogravure, watercolour, colour pencil, varnish, pomade, plasticine, blue fur, gold leaf and crystals (image source: http://www.hauserwirth.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, DeLuxe, 2005, a portfolio of 60 etchings with photogravure, spit-bite, collage, cutting, scratching, silkscreen, offset lithography and hand-building Photo: D. James Dee (image source: http://www.hauserwirth.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, eXelento, 2004, plasticine, ink and paper on canvas, 96 x 192 inches (243.8 x 487.7 cm) (image source: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Pomp Bang, 2003, paper, ink, plasticine and polymer on canvas, 96 x 192 inches (243.8 x 487.7 cm) (image source: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Double Natural, 2002, plasticine, ink and paper on canvas, 96 x 192 inches (243.8 x 487.7 cm) (image source: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Falls & Flips, 2001, plasticine, ink and paper on canvas, 96 x 192 inches (243.8 x 487.7 cm) (image source: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Blubber, 2000, ink, pencil and paper on linen, 120 x 192 inches (304.8 x 487.7 cm) Photo: Tom Powel Imaging (image source: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, They Could Still Serve, 2000, pigment, paper and glue on linen 120 x 96 inches (304.8 x 243.8 cm) Photo: Tom Powel Imaging (image source: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ellen Gallagher, Conglimpscious, 1997, oil ink and paper on canvas, 120 x 96 inches (305 x 244 cm) (image source: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Selected Interview:

Ellen Gallagher

By Quinn Latimer, 2009


You often make use of American historical sources. Do you think your work is perceived differently outside the US as a result?

Because of shared historic references with my work, there can be a more nuanced reading of it in the US, but for the same reason, the American response can also be a bit static. An important element is the layering of historical fragments and ephemera, with which I make an attempt toward a precise nonsense. But if these images are read in a limited way, tied to some kind of caricature of being and body, then possibility gets emptied out of the reading.

There seems to be a tension in your practice between minimalist abstraction and the more figurative narratives that come out of your found materials.

Yes. I see these elements in my work as a form of dynamics — a merging between the constructions of a “New Negro” that was an important development in the Harlem Renaissance, and the concurrent developments in European modernist abstraction. Combining these elements is my reaction to the artificial schism between figuration and abstraction. See, for instance, sculptors like Wildfire Edmonia Lewis, poets like Claude McKay, and the gravedigger totems of Malevich.

You once said that you had “a kind of longing for … the paintings to function through the characters of the ads — to function as a kind of chart or a map of this lost world.” What is it about these lost worlds that you would like to re-create?

It is not so much a lost world as it is a world not yet visible. It is one of these realms that appear through openings in perception when cultural strictures shift. Its appearance is both all of a sudden and as if it was always already there. That is why I tend to use familiar found elements like penmanship paper and magazines in my work. Using such materials allows the painting to open up in my process of direct drawing — the page becomes both a character and a ground for the work.

How will this longing manifest itself in your London exhibition?

In the new paintings, the advertising characters, the essays, and the historical narratives are cut and reanimated on the canvas. There are moments of legibility and blank expansions between them. As you cross these points, there is both recovery and loss. Meaning is generated by the elasticity between associations. The work comes out of my desire to create an expansive, fluid realm that is both the concrete historical fragments it is made up of and the new form it describes—the way a font is both what it is made of and what it says.

Any influences right now, artistic or otherwise? My recent visit to Madagascar, TV on the Radio, and the Crack Fox.

(end)

Interview Source:

http://www.artinfo.com/news/story/30340/ellen-gallagher/

Image Source:

http://www.gagosian.com/artists/ellen-gallagher/exhibitions/

http://www.hauserwirth.com/exhibitions/44/ellen-gallagher-deluxe/view/

links:

http://www.db-artmag.com/archiv/2006/e/1/1/408.html

http://www.brooklynrail.org/2005/03/art/ellen-gallagher

 

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About fARTiculate

Transmissions from an island somewhere in the Philippines. Integrating daily art practice & other initiatives from the physical world down to virtual space. To see my daily artworks, you can visit my site at: http://dailypractice.tumblr.com http://brownskinartist.multiply.com
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One Response to 28 Marso 2011 post: Ellen Gallagher, Selected Works & Interview

  1. mwilli1515 says:

    this is good work

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