4 February 2011 post: Ed Ruscha, Selected Works & Interview

Ed Ruscha, Fountain of Crystal, 2009 Acrylic on canvas 30 1/8 x 36 1/8 inches (76.5 x 91.8 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Higher Standards, Lower Prices, 2007 Acrylic on canvas Diptych: 48 x 220 inches overall (122 x 558.8 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Azteca/Azteca in Decline, 2007 Acrylic on canvas 48 x 330 inches each (122 x 838 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Smashed Pane, 2007 Acrylic on museum board paper 12-1/4 x 9-3/8 inches (31.1 x 23.8cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, THEN & NOW, 2005 142 gelatin silver prints in a wood box 27-1/2 x 39-3/8 inches (69.9 x 100 cm) Edition of 10; 6 APs (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, The End #43, 2003 Acrylic, ink and pencil on museum board, 16-1/8 x 30-1/16 inches (41 x 76.4 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Solo Gigoolos, 2002 Acrylic on canvas 60-1/8 x 60-1/8 inches (152.7 x 152.7 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Step on No Pets, 2002 Acrylic on canvas 64-1/8 x 72-1/8 inches (162.9 x 183.2 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Porch Crop, 2001 Acrylic on canvas 64-1/8 x 72-1/8 inches (162.6 x 183.2 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Clarence Jones, 2001 Acrylic on canvas 72 x 124-1/8 inches (182.9 x 315.3 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Never Odd or Even, 2001 Acrylic on canvas 64 x 72 inches (162.6 x 182.9 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Alvarado to Doheny, 1998 Acrylic on canvas 70 x 108 inches (177.8 x 274.3 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Hollywood, Sunset, Santa Monica, Vine, 1998 Acrylic on canvas 70 x 138 inches (177.8 x 350.5 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, An Exhibition of Gasoline Powered Engines, 1993 Acrylic on canvas 84 x 84 inches (213.4 x 213.4 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, The Mighty Ones, 1993 Acrylic on lunette-shaped canvas 66 x 137 inches (167.7 x 348 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Blue Collar Tool & Die, 1992 Acrylic on canvas 52 x 116 inches (132.1 x 294.6 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Name, Address, Phone Number, 1986 Acrylic on canvas 59 x 145 1/2 inches (149.9 x 369.6 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Homeward Bound, 1986 Acrylic on canvas 2 panels: 120 x 108 inches overall (304.8 x 274.3 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Will 100 Artists Please Draw A 1950 Ford from Memory?, 1977 Pastel on paper 23-1/8 x 29-1/8 inches (58.8 x 74 cm) Photo © Douglas M. Parker Studio (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Lame Theme, 1975 Pastel on paper 14-1/2 x 22-7/8 inches (36.8 x 58.1 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Los Angeles County Museum on Fire, 1968 Oil on canvas 52-1/2 x 133-1/2 inches (135.9 x 339.1 cm0 (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Jelly, 1967 Oil on canvas 20 x 23-7/8 inches (50.8 x 60.6 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Ripe, 1967 Oil on canvas 59-1/4 x 55 inches (150.5 x 139.7 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Mason Williams & Patrick Blackwell, Royal Road Test, 1967, spiral-bound photodocumentary book (photo courtesy of: http://www.secretforts.blogspot.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Twin Palms, 1965/2003 Gelatin silver print Image: 7-3/8 x 7-3/8 inches (18.7 x 18.7 cm) Ed. of 8 (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Red-Yellow Scream, 1964 Tempera on paper 14-3/8 x 10-3/4 inches (36.5 x 27.4 cm) (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Knox Less, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 1962 Unique gelatin silver print Image: 4-3/4 x 5-3/4 inches (12.1 x 14.6 cm) Photo © Douglas M. Parker Studio (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Spam, 1961/2003 Gelatin silver printImage: 13 x 10 inches (33 x 25.4 cm) Ed. of 8 (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Ross the Rooster, 1960 Unique gelatin silver print 14 x 11 inches (35.6 x 27.9 cm) © Ed Ruscha (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

 

Ed Ruscha, Joe's Plymouth, 1960 Unique gelatin silver print Image: 14 x 6 inches (35.6 x 15.2 cm) Photo © Douglas M. Parker (photo courtesy of: http://www.gagosian.com)

 

Selected Interview:

 

Ed Ruscha: Interview

by Ossian Ward, February 2008

 

OW: What was the impetus for the two ‘Azteca’ pictures?

ER: ‘I was driving around Mexico City and saw this painting on a wall that surprised and confounded me. It wasn’t a commercial mural, but painted by a guerrilla group, and while it looks like a flag, for me it symbolised everything I’d seen in Mexico. I had an urge to make my own version, so I took photos to detail it accurately. I took it a step further into the future , fantasising it as a symbol of an empire that was in decay. Words like “Montezuma” or “Olmec” came to mind, but I settled on “Azteca”, an ancient civilisation crumbling and decomposing.’

OW:Is there a sense that you’re depicting the current American empire in decline too?

ER: ‘It’s certainly there in the show; it’s part of this idea that things are beginning to show their age. But I don’t pound my chest with any message, there’s no rolling thunder urgency behind the works. They’re just simple ideas made with some simple tools that end up as paintings on walls.’

OW: Are you interested in who’s running for the presidency?

ER: ‘Not enough. I don’t watch TV, so I feel like I’m left out of the American fabric or something. People refuse to believe that I’ve never been to Starbucks or Disneyland – I mean what kind of American am I? So in a sense, maybe I’m thumbing my nose at America.’

OW: Yet you’re so closely tied to California and have consistently paid homage to Americana…

ER: ‘All my artistic response comes from American things and I guess I’ve always had a weakness for heroic imagery. “Azteca” is heroism at its finest: it could represent arms flung open, searchlights going at diagonals or even blaring horns. But a standard gasoline station is similarly heroic.’

OW: Why did you name the statuesque mountain ranges ‘Higher Standards, Lower Prices’?

ER: ‘I was searching for a title and I saw this slogan on a grocery truck in LA. In the second of the two paintings these buildings suddenly shoot up out of nowhere like an instant industrial village of Wal-Marts and Costcos – so that says to me lower prices. But then you have your higher standards – there’s some serious geology going on in those mountains.’

OW: Where does this focus on erosion come from? Is it about looking back and remixing previous work or is it about getting older?

ER: ‘I had paintings in my studio that were looking at me and I didn’t want to give up on them. Its almost like I’m a farmer, practicing crop rotation. However, I can’t say that just because one image looks older or greyer than the other that it’s necessarily negative. I’m just pointing up the issue, not commenting – I don’t have a social agenda.’

OW: Why are they all horizontal?

ER: ‘When you’re on a highway, viewing the western US with the mountains and the flatness and the desert and all that, it’s very much like my paintings. I’m into the way movie theatres spread out into the world of CinemaScope and Panavision. Someday I dream of maybe painting much taller pictures like Cy Twombly or Peter Doig but bringing off largeness like that is quite an accomplishment for an artist.’

OW: Why is the sunset one of your favoured backdrops?

ER: ‘I’m not the kind of artist who props their canvas up in nature. Instead I see the sunset as an extension of the landscape best experienced by driving or looking into it. The drama of anything is always amped up by a sunset or a sunrise, it’s almost like the sound of trumpets without the trumpets. Likewise in “Azteca”, you hear the fanfare of the trumpets but you don’t necessarily see them.’

(end)

 

Interview Source:

http://www.timeout.com/london/art/features/4246/Ed_Ruscha-interview.html

Image Source:

http://www.gagosian.com/artists/ed-ruscha/exhibitions/

http://secretforts.blogspot.com/2009/11/road-tested-ed-ruscha-royal-road-test.html

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About fARTiculate

Transmissions from an island somewhere in the Philippines. Integrating daily art practice & other initiatives from the physical world down to virtual space. To see my daily artworks, you can visit my site at: http://dailypractice.tumblr.com http://brownskinartist.multiply.com
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