17 January 2011 post: Mimmo Paladino, Selected Works & Interview

 

“Art should generate ceaseless questions and never give answers.” -Mimmo Paladino

 

 

 

Mimmo Paladino Il Respiro della Bellezza I, 1990 - 1991 oil on wood 81 x 81 x 12 inches 205 x 205 x 30 cm (photo courtesy of: http://www.speronewestwater.com)

 

 

 

 

Mimmo Paladino Il Respiro della Bellezza V, 1990 - 1991 oil on canvas and wood 81 x 81 x 12 inches 205 x 205 x 30 cm (photo courtesy of: http://www.speronewestwater.com)

 

 

 

 

Mimmo Paladino Il Respiro della Bellezza II, 1990 - 1991 oil, enamel and collage on wood 81 x 81 x 12 inches 205 x 205 x 30 cm (photo courtesy of: http://www.speronewestwater.com)

 

 

 

 

Mimmo Paladino Il Respiro della Bellezza VI, 1990 - 1991 oil on wood 81 x 81 x 12 inches 205 x 205 x 30 cm (photo courtesy of: http://www.speronewestwater.com)

 

 

 

 

Mimmo Paladino Amico Mio Amico Mio, 1989 oil on canvas 133 7/8 x 185 inches 340 x 469.9 cm (photo courtesy of: http://www.speronewestwater.com)

 

 

 

 

Mimmo Paladino Caduto a Ragione, 1989 mixed media on canvas with wood frame 85 7/8 x 66 7/8 inches 218.2 x 169.9 cm (photo courtesy of: http://www.speronewestwater.com)

 

 

 

 

Mimmo Paladino Il Silenzio e Il Pane, 1989 oil on canvas with mixed media 133 7/8 x 185 inches 340 x 469.9 cm (photo courtesy of: http://www.speronewestwater.com)

 

 

 

 

Mimmo Paladino Cacciatore Di Stelle, 1989 mixed media on wood 133 7/8 x 185 inches 340 x 469.9 cm (photo courtesy of: http://www.speronewestwater.com)

 

 

 

 

Mimmo Paladino Destinato a Volare, 1989 oil on wood with aluminum 78 3/4 x 96 1/2 inches 200 x 245.1 cm (photo courtesy of: http://www.speronewestwater.com)

 

 

 

 

Mimmo Paladino Inizio D'Opera, 1989 oil on canvas with bronze 133 7/8 x 185 inches 340 x 469.9 cm (photo courtesy of: http://www.speronewestwater.com)

 

 

 

Selected Interview:

Mimmo Paladino Q&A

Why a collaboration with Brian Eno in Rome?
Brian Eno and I worked together in 1999 with an ambient, site specific installation at the Round House in Chalk Farm, London. The exhibition featured drawings and terracotta sculptures – about 30 reclining figures and 20 attendant crocodiles called I Dormienti, ‘The Sleepers’ accompanied by Eno’s sound production. We’ve been wanting to work together ever since. Eno initially was thinking of creating something in the Forum, but we eventually decided for the Ara Pacis.

Your connection to the Ara Pacis is well documented by the six-metre high glittering mosaic that you were commissioned to make in 2000. But why choose the Ara Pacis, rather than a contemporary art museum in Rome such as Macro for an installation?
Richard Meier’s building is a prestigious architectural monument that has a special synergy with our work.

It’s the only place in the centre of Rome that I find truly speaks the modern language. Since the opening of the Ara Pacis’ two years ago, it’s become incredibly popular attracting large numbers of visitors. Now the area where the installation is placed is set to become a contemporary art space to be used for other exhibitions. Initially it was conceived as an area for archaeological remains, but I think that its function as a new centre for contemporary art will grow.

Is there a running theme in the installation?
The monumentality of Ara Pacis is picked up by the large circular sculpture upstairs, the only piece located next to the Augustus Mausoleum. The circle recalls the geometric shapes that the artist Paolo Uccello employed on some of the warriors helmets in the battle of San Romano on display at the Uffizi in Florence. On the lower ground is a continuous installation of 150 casts of shoes, a cast of metal branches with a conjuror’s top hat balanced on top as if performing a balance trick and a 35 metre long metal train, made of grids and cages in which I placed sleeping bodies and terracotta urns. The white walls carry essential, geometric red patterns as well as some signs made with coal. In a niche metal branches resonate with vibration when touched. They are all punctuations and visual elements of a musical score and lighting that makes it closer to theatre than art.

The connection between historical past and spaces and contemporary art seems to be becoming a recurrent theme of your commissions.
More and more I’m asked to create work within historical contexts or within strong nature settings. Recently I created a 20,000sqm scaffolding decoration for the renovation of Modena’s famous monument La Ghirlandina. I think it’s the first time they’ve asked an artist to cover up a restoration site rather than resort to an advertising campaign. In Solopaca (near Benevento) I created a blue-grey installation inside the side of a mountain next to a newly built aqueduct. It’s part of a process exploring the relationship between architecture, nature and function. With this Ara Pacis installation, the sound and the light creates a point of contact between the ancient Roman sculptures and my work.

(end)

 

Interview Source:

http://www.wallpaper.com/art/mimmo-paladino-qa/2160

Image Source:

http://www.speronewestwater.com/cgi-bin/iowa/exhibits/related.html?record=54&info=works

 

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About fARTiculate

Transmissions from an island somewhere in the Philippines. Integrating daily art practice & other initiatives from the physical world down to virtual space. To see my daily artworks, you can visit my site at: http://dailypractice.tumblr.com http://brownskinartist.multiply.com
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